Kiss The Dragon

Posted by Phillip Gordon on Monday, February 1, 2010
If you do not take the time to stop and really consider what you care about, you will be at the command of your compulsions.  The will is the natural capacity to organise ones self toward outcomes.  The way you wish to be in life as well as what you want in your life.  The will is interested in what you care about as its source of inspiration.  Whether we are consciously caring about something or unconsciously being driven, the will engages and begins its task of organising you and life about you to achieve the outcome it recognises.  If you are unable to be with yourself, unable to accept who and what you are as you are, you will always be driven by your compulsive self.  The push from the past is subtle and evasive.  These compulsions are set up in early development and form a structural mechanism that is designed to get you where and what you want.  The consideration here is not so much the compulsions themselves, rather the buried beliefs that form the structure that maintains our lives.  Unless we are willing to take that journey down amongst the cave, to uncover this structure of beliefs, to face our wounds that we based the beliefs on, we will continue to function in a manner that belies our deep nature. 

It is like taking on the dragon in the cave.  There are many myths and tales of dragons springing from many cultures around the world.  These are but ideas designed to inform us of hidden truths about humanity.  It is why so many cultures share similar myths, even though they are not aware of each other’s existence.  As we encounter a story and grasp its hidden meaning, we are able to draw on its wisdom in order to free ourselves from the grip of our own certainties. 

The particular interpretation of the dragon myth I like to draw upon goes like this.  I shall not recount the story itself; rather relate the insight I have had.  The dragon lives in a cave.  Firstly we must ask what is the dragon.  My understanding is that the dragon represents the aspects of our nature that we are most afraid of.  These are both personal and collective.  We cannot entirely escape the culture we are born to.  It has as much hold on us as the conditions of our family.  It is our broader context.  For even our little family is defined by our culture.  At fist glance the dragon symbolizes all the factors in our lives that we do not wish to face.  The hidden laws that tell us we cannot, the personal conditioning that tells us that life is this way and not that.  It holds the staff of thou shalt not, as well as thou shalt.  This is right this is wrong.  However if we investigate further we will see that what the dragon really embodies is our deep true natures.  How can this be, how can this beast of burden be a recognition of our greatness when it seems to represent so much distraction from our soaring souls.  How else will it get out attention if it does not throw up our greatest fears and most fixed rules?

Let us to the cave for a moment before we move the dragon’s tale forward.  Simply what the cave symbolises is our deep unconscious self.  So what is the unconscious self?  It is exactly what it states, the part of our consciousness that we cannot see.  It is here in this cave that we burry what we do not want to behold, what we consider to be unviable, that which will not support our life.  Yet there is a trick here.  As the name states, it is unconscious, therefore it will always remain so, or it will be named something else.  The cave is more importantly the home of The Mystery, and shall always be so.  That which we will never unravel, never be able to put our fingers on and name.  It is the source of imagination; it is the home of soul.

What is in the cave with the dragon?  Often what you will find is a damsel and a cash of gold.  Two more symbols to be unravelled on our quest.  First let us look at what the damsel represents, and why she needs rescuing.  The damsel is the voice of our feminine natures.  She is our intuitive self, our imagination, the creative part of our natures.  She is the connection to The Mystery, to the wild and wonderful aspects of inner life.  The feminine helps us to embrace the flesh and earth as expressions of the divine.  Without such qualities our lives are bound by reason and superstition alone.  There is no release from our compulsions or the social structures and norms that bind us.  Without the feminine we will remain slaves to conformity.

The gold is self-explanatory; it is our most precious self.  The substance of alchemy as we transform our leaden weights into the lightness of being.  The gold is our natural gifts and abilities that we have lost in our conditioning of self to survive and search for meaning as we develop into adulthood. 

The point I wish to make here is that if we interpret the dragon as the usher, the beast that is calling us into battle with ourselves, then in fact it is a friend.  We see the dragon as a threat, because we do not want to look at ourselves, do not want to face the fears and thinking that we are so attached to.  We believe that if we confront ourselves at such depth we will loose our sense of self and disintegrate.  Yet what the dragon has is the very keys to our wholeness.  The very things we are afraid of are the gold we yearn for.  If we constantly view life at face value, we will miss this for what we seek is something other than what we are.  Our history tells us that there must be something other than what we have, that will bring fulfilment and meaning.  We seek our gold outside of ourselves; we seek to find it in some place other than ourselves. 

Dragon myths are quests because we must undertake them; there is a task inherent within the journey.  Our greatest challenge is to look at who we are with different eyes and discover the path down into the cave and rediscover, redefine ourselves.  The aspects of our nature we abhor are the gold we seek.  Learn to kiss the dragon and it will walk alongside you throughout your life as a companion not a foe.



Tags: enlightenment "personal development" soul myth dragon mystic purpose 
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About Me


Phillip C Gordon I am an Alchemist, falling into the fires of transformation over and over as I realise the gold that I am. I choose to serve all humanity to that end, to raise the consciousness of humanity, one by one if that be the case. I am a writer, a speaker, an actor and fool.

Kiss The Dragon

Posted by Phillip Gordon on Monday, February 1, 2010
If you do not take the time to stop and really consider what you care about, you will be at the command of your compulsions.  The will is the natural capacity to organise ones self toward outcomes.  The way you wish to be in life as well as what you want in your life.  The will is interested in what you care about as its source of inspiration.  Whether we are consciously caring about something or unconsciously being driven, the will engages and begins its task of organising you and life about you to achieve the outcome it recognises.  If you are unable to be with yourself, unable to accept who and what you are as you are, you will always be driven by your compulsive self.  The push from the past is subtle and evasive.  These compulsions are set up in early development and form a structural mechanism that is designed to get you where and what you want.  The consideration here is not so much the compulsions themselves, rather the buried beliefs that form the structure that maintains our lives.  Unless we are willing to take that journey down amongst the cave, to uncover this structure of beliefs, to face our wounds that we based the beliefs on, we will continue to function in a manner that belies our deep nature. 

It is like taking on the dragon in the cave.  There are many myths and tales of dragons springing from many cultures around the world.  These are but ideas designed to inform us of hidden truths about humanity.  It is why so many cultures share similar myths, even though they are not aware of each other’s existence.  As we encounter a story and grasp its hidden meaning, we are able to draw on its wisdom in order to free ourselves from the grip of our own certainties. 

The particular interpretation of the dragon myth I like to draw upon goes like this.  I shall not recount the story itself; rather relate the insight I have had.  The dragon lives in a cave.  Firstly we must ask what is the dragon.  My understanding is that the dragon represents the aspects of our nature that we are most afraid of.  These are both personal and collective.  We cannot entirely escape the culture we are born to.  It has as much hold on us as the conditions of our family.  It is our broader context.  For even our little family is defined by our culture.  At fist glance the dragon symbolizes all the factors in our lives that we do not wish to face.  The hidden laws that tell us we cannot, the personal conditioning that tells us that life is this way and not that.  It holds the staff of thou shalt not, as well as thou shalt.  This is right this is wrong.  However if we investigate further we will see that what the dragon really embodies is our deep true natures.  How can this be, how can this beast of burden be a recognition of our greatness when it seems to represent so much distraction from our soaring souls.  How else will it get out attention if it does not throw up our greatest fears and most fixed rules?

Let us to the cave for a moment before we move the dragon’s tale forward.  Simply what the cave symbolises is our deep unconscious self.  So what is the unconscious self?  It is exactly what it states, the part of our consciousness that we cannot see.  It is here in this cave that we burry what we do not want to behold, what we consider to be unviable, that which will not support our life.  Yet there is a trick here.  As the name states, it is unconscious, therefore it will always remain so, or it will be named something else.  The cave is more importantly the home of The Mystery, and shall always be so.  That which we will never unravel, never be able to put our fingers on and name.  It is the source of imagination; it is the home of soul.

What is in the cave with the dragon?  Often what you will find is a damsel and a cash of gold.  Two more symbols to be unravelled on our quest.  First let us look at what the damsel represents, and why she needs rescuing.  The damsel is the voice of our feminine natures.  She is our intuitive self, our imagination, the creative part of our natures.  She is the connection to The Mystery, to the wild and wonderful aspects of inner life.  The feminine helps us to embrace the flesh and earth as expressions of the divine.  Without such qualities our lives are bound by reason and superstition alone.  There is no release from our compulsions or the social structures and norms that bind us.  Without the feminine we will remain slaves to conformity.

The gold is self-explanatory; it is our most precious self.  The substance of alchemy as we transform our leaden weights into the lightness of being.  The gold is our natural gifts and abilities that we have lost in our conditioning of self to survive and search for meaning as we develop into adulthood. 

The point I wish to make here is that if we interpret the dragon as the usher, the beast that is calling us into battle with ourselves, then in fact it is a friend.  We see the dragon as a threat, because we do not want to look at ourselves, do not want to face the fears and thinking that we are so attached to.  We believe that if we confront ourselves at such depth we will loose our sense of self and disintegrate.  Yet what the dragon has is the very keys to our wholeness.  The very things we are afraid of are the gold we yearn for.  If we constantly view life at face value, we will miss this for what we seek is something other than what we are.  Our history tells us that there must be something other than what we have, that will bring fulfilment and meaning.  We seek our gold outside of ourselves; we seek to find it in some place other than ourselves. 

Dragon myths are quests because we must undertake them; there is a task inherent within the journey.  Our greatest challenge is to look at who we are with different eyes and discover the path down into the cave and rediscover, redefine ourselves.  The aspects of our nature we abhor are the gold we seek.  Learn to kiss the dragon and it will walk alongside you throughout your life as a companion not a foe.



Tags: enlightenment "personal development" soul myth dragon mystic purpose 
blog comments powered by Disqus